A review of sara teasdales poem there will come soft rains

A second collection in was very successful and brought her many admirers. Teasdale gives the human-like characteristics to the nature, as oppose to the humans, to show that humans have lost their human-like qualities by destroying themselves through war. Sara Teasdale wrote this poem during the Great War.

Suffice it to say that she seems, in "Soft Rains," to crave order where there is none and repudiates the chaotic human race in response. However, the poem does not move in to a consideration of the war in any detail.

Robins will appear fiery in their feathers, but that is the only fiery element, the "war" having long been over. Four years later in frail health after a bout of pneumonia she took her own life with an overdose of barbiturates.

She furthers this idea when she states how the destruction of humanity through war will not affect nature. Significantly, the alliteration she accorded nature -- "shimmering sound," "feathery fire," "tremulous trees" -- is also gone, as if mankind inspires no poetry in her and deserves no figurative usages.

There Will Come Soft Rain - Poem by Sara Teasdale

She refers to a war, the Great War specifically, that the humans have created. While describing the nature, she refers to the senses of a living being, giving nature life and meaning. Ill health meant that she was educated privately for many years before beginning school when she was fourteen.

Is it a bleak vision of the future or one that takes strength from the enduring qualities and beauty of nature?

Summary of

Teasdale presents each image in pleasant euphonic diction, perfectly rhymed; all is well in this future world. In the poem, Teasdale uses imagery and personification of the animals to contrast it with human beings and war.

In her early twenties her potential as a poet was seen by a local Missouri newspaper that published her work and a full collection of poems quickly followed.

She married in although it seems she regretted rejecting another suitor, the poet Vachel Lindsay. Thirdly, the season of spring builds and creates, while war that humans have created destroys and kills. About Sara Teasdale By the end of the war Teasdale was a celebrated American poet and winner of prestigious prizes for her poetry.

The poem talks about the beauty of nature, the ugliness of humans and the contrast between the two. However, as she mentions human beings, the tone of the poem changes dramatically. Alliteration and Lack of It Her poem breaks after line 6, telling of a human race that obliterated itself in the chaos of "the war," and predicting that the memory of man is also gone; "not one She moved with her husband to New York City during the war but her marriage eventually ended in divorce in Through this poem, she points out to the world that war is unnecessary and will only result to its separation from nature.

She uses beautiful, lively words to describe nature, but contrasting words to describe humanity. These examples show clear contrast between nature and humans. Additionally, she categorizes nature and people into two distinctive groups, though humans count themselves as an evolvement from nature.

The title of the poem was adapted by Ray Bradbury in his short story. Summary Robs Teasdale of Art Nature will arrive in all its simplicity; spring will not miss absent, war-destroyed mankind. As the poem starts to describe humanity and war, the jolly mood changes into a serious one.There will come soft rains and the smell of the ground, And swallows circling with their shimmering sound; And frogs in the pools singing at night, And wild-plum trees in tremulous white; Robins will wear their feathery fire, Whistling their whims on a low fence-wire; And not one will know of the war, not one Will care at last when it is done.

Sara Teasdale, with her line poem "There Will Come Soft Rains," joins Emerson, Thoreau and other transcendental Romantics who believe that mankind is a blemish on nature; the natural world, once humans are gone from the earth, will resume its merry and cyclical way.

There will come soft rain and the smell of the ground And swallows circling with their shimmering sound And frogs in the pools singing at night And.

Page There Will Come Soft Rain Poem by Sara Teasdale - Poem /5(22). Sara Teasdale was an American lyrical poet.

She was born Sara Trevor Teasdale in St. Louis, Missouri, and after her marriage in she went by the name Sara Teasdale Filsinger. Teasdale's first poem was published in Reedy's Mirror, a local newspaper, in /5.

Sara Teasdale, - (War Time) There will come soft rains and the smell of the ground, And swallows circling with their shimmering sound; And frogs in the pools singing at night, And wild plum trees in tremulous white, Robins will wear their feathery fire Whistling their whims on a low fence-wire; And not one will know of the war, not one Will care at last when it is done.

Sara Teasdale's poem "There Will Come Soft Rains" was first published in in her collection Flame and Shadow. It was written during or just after World War I, the first modern war to use terrible modern weapons, including massive modern artillery and chemical weapons.

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A review of sara teasdales poem there will come soft rains
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